Untitled   idslist.friendsov.com   13465 records.
   Search for
21  
5 November 1998 11:28  
  
Date: Thu, 5 Nov 1998 11:28:58 +0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: Mary.Doran[at]mail.bl.uk (Mary Doran) Subject: Ir-D Our Games MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Message-ID: <1312884591.DDB26E41873.5704[at]bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Our Games
  
Anthony:
I have checked the British Library's holdings of Our Games (B.L.
shelfmark: P.P.8001.m) and I'm afraid that it appears that we only
hold the volumes for 1963 and 1964.

You might like to try the 2 other copyright libraries in England
which have a right to claim material published in the Republic of
Ireland:
Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, Broad Street, Oxford OX1 3BG
Tel: 01865 277000
E-mail: enquiries[at]bodley.ox.ac.uk
or
University Library,University of Cambridge,West Road,Cambridge CB3 9DR
Tel: 01223 333000
E-mail: library[at]ula.cam.ac.uk

Alternatively, you might wish to contact the GAA directly and see if you
could obtain from them a copy of the article you require:
Gaelic Athletic Association, Croke Park, Dublin 3
Tel: 00 353 1 363222
Enquiries to: Publications Officer.
Held there is a large collection of documentation from the founding of the
Association to the present, including minutes of all meetings, photographs,
programmes, and printed material. (According to the Directory of Irish
Archives).

Best wishes
Mary Doran
Curator, Modern Irish Collections
British Library, 96 Euston Road, London NW1 2DB

______________________________ Reply Separator _________________________________
Subject: Ir-D Our Games
Author: "cornelius mcnicholas" at Internet
Date: 03/11/98 05:21




anthony mcnicholas mcnichc[at]wmin.ac.uk

Dear list, I wonder can anyone help me. I came across a reference to a
C19 journalist I am interested in - Dennis Holland. There is, apparently
a two page biography of him in Our Games 1968 the annual of the GAA. I
was in Dublin recently for a few days and tried to get Our Games at the
National Library. The 1968 issue was missing. 'That's strange, try
Trinity' they said. I did. 1968 was similarly listed as being in the
library but was also missing. I was unable to chase the matter up
further while in Ireland, but I would like get my hands on the article.
I wonder could anyone tell me where I might see a copy? I am in the
London area.
 TOP
22  
7 November 1998 11:28  
  
Date: Sat, 7 Nov 1998 11:28:58 +0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: "Patrick O'Sullivan" <P.OSullivan[at]Bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Newfoundland
  
Subject: Ir-D Newfoundland
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

On Newfoundland...

There is
O'Hara, Aidan, 'The Irish in Newfoundland', in Galway Labour History
Group The Emigrant Experience, Galway, 1991.

I've never seen this, so I don't know how useful it will be.

Professor George J. Casey
Department of English Language and Literature
Memorial University of Newfoundland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada A1C 5S7
has written on Irish language survival in Newfoundland and has a general
interest in the history of the Irish on the island. He may know more.

Paddy O'Sullivan

- --
Patrick O'Sullivan
Head of the Irish Diaspora Research Unit
Email Patrick O'Sullivan
Irish-Diaspora list
Irish Diaspora Studies http://www.brad.ac.uk/diaspora

Irish Diaspora Research Unit
Department of Interdisciplinary Human Studies
University of Bradford
Bradford BD7 1DP
Yorkshire
England
 TOP
23  
7 November 1998 16:28  
  
Date: Sat, 7 Nov 1998 16:28:58 +0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: "Patrick O'Sullivan" <P.OSullivan[at]Bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Conference, Bath, England
  
Subject: Ir-D Conference, Bath, England
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

Forwarded on behalf of...
L.Litvack[at]qub.ac.uk

Dear Friends,

For those interested in the SSNCI's conference in Bath next
spring, check out the following URL for a call for papers and
further info:

http://www.bathspa.ac.uk/hum/irldconf.htm

All good wishes,

Leon

----------------------
Leon Litvack
Head of Undergraduate Teaching
School of English
Queen's University of Belfast
Belfast BT7 1NN
Northern Ireland, UK

L.Litvack[at]qub.ac.uk
http://www.qub.ac.uk/english/prometheus.html

Tel. +44-1232-273266
Fax +44-1232-314615
 TOP
24  
10 November 1998 10:28  
  
Date: Tue, 10 Nov 1998 10:28:58 +0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: "Patrick O'Sullivan" <P.OSullivan[at]Bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Conference, Bath, England
  
Subject: Ir-D Conference, Bath, England
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

Forwarded on behalf of...
L.Litvack[at]qub.ac.uk


Dear friends,

If you have not been able to get through to Bath Spa College's
web page for SSNCI conference details, it is because their
server has been down for a couple of days.

You should keep trying; but as a back-up, please e-mail the
conference organiser, Brian Griffin, for details. His e-mail
address is b.griffin[at]bathspa.ac.uk

All good wishes,

Leon

----------------------
Leon Litvack
Head of Undergraduate Teaching
School of English
Queen's University of Belfast
Belfast BT7 1NN
Northern Ireland, UK

L.Litvack[at]qub.ac.uk
http://www.qub.ac.uk/english/prometheus.html

Tel. +44-1232-273266
Fax +44-1232-314615


[Moderator's Note:
The SSNCI conference Web site is
http://www.bathspa.ac.uk/hum/irldconf.htm
And, yes, anyone who runs a project - like the Irish-Diaspora list -
which connects with a large number of academic Web and email servers
will know that they often shut down at weekends, while they clean out
the pipes or something.
Drives me mad.
P.O'S]
 TOP
25  
11 November 1998 11:11  
  
Date: Wed, 11 Nov 1998 11:11:11 +0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: "Patrick O'Sullivan" <P.OSullivan[at]Bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D WWI
  
Subject: Ir-D WWI
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

In 1918, on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month
the guns of World War I ceased firing...

And, 80 years later, today, on November 11, at Messines (Mesen) in
Flanders, President McAleese, the Queen of England, and the King and
Queen of Belgium, dedicate a monument to the memory of those Irishmen
who died in the Great War. The monument itself - a 100ft round tower,
symbolically built with stones from all 32 of Ireland's counties - is
rather ugly. But I suppose it will mellow.

Some 30,000 men from what is now the Republic of Ireland died in the
Great War, and 20,000 from what is now Northern Ireland. I am not being
cynically detached if I suggest that there is a possible fascinating
case study here, of the processes of memory and memorialising, and the
uses of history.

There are interesting cultural turning points, in the re-remembering of
the Great War dead - of which the most significant is most probably
Frank McGuinness's 1985 play Observe the Sons of Ulster Marching Towards
the Somme. Many have commented on nationalist Ireland's 'collective
amnesia' about Irish involvement in the War - I can particularly
recommend an elegant little essay by Keith Jeffery, 'Irish Culture and
the Great War', Bullan, Vol. 1, No. 2, Autumn 1994.

Those of us who study the Irish outside Ireland were aware of this
amnesiac gap - the largest army ever to have left Ireland, the greatest
number of Irish dead in any conflict - and were aware, of course, of the
implications of involvement in the War for Irish-Americans, Irish-
Australians, Irish-Canadians. Scholars, like Tom Dooley and Myles
Dungan, who have studied the Irish of World War I, have reported meeting
an initial reluctance to understand the significance of what they were
trying to do. There has been a cultural change, and it is a change that
has been lead by writers and scholars.

But the case study of that cultural change would not be complete if it
looked only at the Irish of Ireland, and the Irish of the Diaspora. For
there has been a change in Britain too. Those who commented on how long
it took Ireland to develop a sober discourse of the Great Famine may
notice how long it has taken England to come to terms with the Great
War, the betrayal of trust, the betrayal of patriotism - when, of
course, the only sober message to come out of the Great War is to
distrust your leaders.

Patrick O'Sullivan
- --
Patrick O'Sullivan
Head of the Irish Diaspora Research Unit
Email Patrick O'Sullivan
Irish-Diaspora list
Irish Diaspora Studies http://www.brad.ac.uk/diaspora

Irish Diaspora Research Unit
Department of Interdisciplinary Human Studies
University of Bradford
Bradford BD7 1DP
Yorkshire
England
 TOP
26  
12 November 1998 10:11  
  
Date: Thu, 12 Nov 1998 10:11:11 +0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: "Patrick O'Sullivan" <P.OSullivan[at]Bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Wild Geese in Japan
  
Subject: Ir-D Wild Geese in Japan
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

For anyone who happens to be in Tokyo next week...

Jardine Wines and Spirits is launching a new Irish Whiskey in Japan
under the Hennessy Brand, and to celebrate they wish to invite the Irish
community to a free tasting at Paddy Foley's pub in Roppongi on
Wednesday 18th November (from 8:00 p.m to 10:00 p.m.).

The new product is called Hennessy Na Geanna (Wild Geese) a reference to
the Hennessys who left Ireland for France in the 18th century.

Light snacks and live Irish music will also be provided.

Paddy O'Sullivan
- --
Patrick O'Sullivan
Head of the Irish Diaspora Research Unit
Email Patrick O'Sullivan
Irish-Diaspora list
Irish Diaspora Studies http://www.brad.ac.uk/diaspora

Irish Diaspora Research Unit
Department of Interdisciplinary Human Studies
University of Bradford
Bradford BD7 1DP
Yorkshire
England
 TOP
27  
12 November 1998 16:11  
  
Date: Thu, 12 Nov 1998 16:11:11 +0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: "Patrick O'Sullivan" <P.OSullivan[at]Bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Macaronic
  
Subject: Ir-D Macaronic
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

Forwarded on behalf of Annraoi O Preith / Harry O'Prey...


From: "Annraoi O Prith"


Beir beannacht is bua,

Michael Curran suggested that you might be in a position to offer advice
/ directions.

I am engaged in a long-term study of Macaronic song / verse in various
languages including, of course, Irish and English. Have you any thoughts
on the subject ?

Le barr measa,

Annraoi O Preith / Harry O'Prey.

[Moderator's Note:
Whilst I collect my thoughts... I thought I'd push this one straight on
to the Irish-Diaspora list. I know that a number of us are interested
in this sort of thing...

Further Moderator's Note:
For Non-Lit folk...
Macaronic verse is poetry in which two or more languages are mixed
together. Strictly this should be comic verse in which lines from a
vernacular language are introduced into a Latin poem - very popular in
16th and 17th century Europe, but not that common in English.

Vivian Mercier, Irish Comic Tradition, p. 165, notes a century of Irish
comic writing which had fun with English surnames - 'Gaelic speakers
found English names irrestistably comic...'

The most famous Irish macaronic is most probably a song by Donnchadh
Ruadh Mac Conmara (Denis Roe Macnamara, 1715-1810), composed to please
the English and the Irish of St. John's, Newfoundland. (Yes,
Newfoundland again.) Lines in English praise the English, lines in
Irish insult the English - and he maintains the rhythms and rimes across
the two languages. Brilliant.

And a further Moderator's Note:
For our American friends...
'Stuck a feather in his hat and called it macaroni...'
does not count as macaronic verse.

PO'S]



- --
Patrick O'Sullivan
Head of the Irish Diaspora Research Unit
Email Patrick O'Sullivan
Irish-Diaspora list
Irish Diaspora Studies http://www.brad.ac.uk/diaspora

Irish Diaspora Research Unit
Department of Interdisciplinary Human Studies
University of Bradford
Bradford BD7 1DP
Yorkshire
England
 TOP
28  
13 November 1998 10:11  
  
Date: Fri, 13 Nov 1998 10:11:11 +0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: "Patrick O'Sullivan" <P.OSullivan[at]Bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Call for Papers, St. Louis
  
Subject: Ir-D Call for Papers, St. Louis
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

Forwarded on behalf of...
Dr. Joy K. Lintelman
Associate Professor of History
Concordia College
Moorhead, MN 56562
tel. 218-299-3491
lintelma[at]cord.edu

As a member of the program committee of the Immigration and Ethnic History
Society (formerly the Immigration History Society), I would like to
encourage submissions for the Organization of American Historians (OAH)
meeting in St. Louis, Missouri in the year 2000. The Society would like to
sponsor sessions at OAH which relate to immigration and ethnicity.

The theme for the 2000 OAH is "The United States and the Wider World,"
certainly a theme which would suggest the inclusion of panels on
immigration and ethnicity. I enclose some excerpts from OAH's call for
papers below, as well as providing the web address for the full CFP:

<<United States historians in the academy and public historians in museums
and other settings increasingly recognize the historical interconnectedness
of the United States and the surrounding world. Such connections are among
the most important and decisive influences on the American experience,not
only with regard to slavery and the slave trade, immigration, settlement
patterns, borderlands, and external trade, but also with respect to
culture, religion, intellectual life, and politics. In taking the United
States and the Wider World for its theme, the program for the Annual
Meeting of the Organization of American Historians for the year 2000 seeks
to encourage a more complete and systematic analysis of the two-way flow of
influence--the impact of wider world on the United States and the impact of
the United States beyond its borders. Our objective is to deepen and enrich
our understanding of the interconnections among local, national, and global
aspects of the North American experience.

<<This Annual Meeting is jointly sponsored by the Organization of American
Historians, the National Council on Public History, and the Missouri
Conference on History. We wish to encourage as much collaboration as
possible within panels and program sessions themselves. Proposals that
include academic and public historians, therefore, are especially welcome.

<<In keeping with recent program practice this year's committee encourages
formats that promote discussion and participation. It welcomes roundtables
and debates with up to five panelists, as well as "poster sessions," in
addition to the traditional format of papers and commentators.

http://www.indiana.edu/~oah/meetings/2000program/call.html


**The deadline for paper proposals to the OAH is 15 January 1999. As
indicated above, the Immigration and Ethnic History Society would like to
sponsor sessions. We encourage individuals or groups to submit proposals
to the IEHS as soon as possible. We can also provide assistance in putting
together panels/sessions if needed. With the January submission deadline
for OAH, time is of the essence.**

Please submit proposals for IEHS sponsorship at the OAH in 2000 to
Dr.Joy Lintelman at the address (snailmail or email) listed below:

Dr. Joy K. Lintelman
Associate Professor of History
Concordia College
Moorhead, MN 56562
tel. 218-299-3491
lintelma[at]cord.edu
 TOP
29  
13 November 1998 12:11  
  
Date: Fri, 13 Nov 1998 12:11:11 +0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: "Patrick O'Sullivan" <P.OSullivan[at]Bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Chicken Soup for the Celtic Soul
  
Subject: Ir-D Chicken Soup for the Celtic Soul
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

Forwarded (albeit with a certain ironic intent) on behalf of...
Michael MacFarlane (michael[at]macfarlane.org)

Subject: "Chicken Soup for the Celtic Soul"

Please forward this message to anybody who might be interested.

Call for Stories:
Do you have a story, poem, anecdote or article about your heritage for the
proposed book "Chicken Soup for the Celtic Soul"? We are excited and delighted
to be collecting stories for another in this wonderful series by Jack Canfield
and Mark Victor Hansen. This will be a book of heartwarming, motivational, and
inspiring stories in any way related to things past, present and future
connected to the Celts or Celtic culture, e.g. Scots, Irish, Welsh, Cornish,
Breton, Manx and their descendants throughout the world.

Chicken Soup stories are about 1250 words long, this works out to be 3 - 6
published book pages.

What a Chicken Soup Story IS

It is an inspirational, true story about ordinary people doing extraordinary
things. Chicken Soup stories are personal and are filled with vivid images. In
some stories, the reader feels that he or she is actually "there" in the scene
with the people involved. Chicken Soup stories have heart...but also something
extra...that element that makes us all feel more helpful, more connected, more
thankful, more passionate, and better about life in general. Chicken Soup
stories often end with a "punch"...creating emotion rather than talking about
it. The stories should leave the reader with one or more of the following:
Goosebumps or butterflies, heartfelt tears, an "aaaaah" feeling, a good belly
laugh, or a more exalted reason to feel alive.

If your story is one of the 101 chosen, you will be paid US$300.00 If it is
used or not you will retain the rights.

With over 30 million "Chicken Soup" books in print, this is an excellent
opportunity to get worldwide attention to the stories of the celts!

Send your stories to us via email if at all possible,
Michael[at]macfarlane.org
mail or fax:
Walters International Speakers Bureau
attn: Michael MacFarlane
P.O. Box 1120
Glendora, CA 91740 USA
Fax: 626-335-6127

Please forward this message to anybody who might be interested.

Le gach deagh dhurachdan
Michael MacFarlane (michael[at]macfarlane.org)
(with Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen proposed, "Chicken Soup for the
Celtic Soul")
 TOP
30  
16 November 1998 04:50  
  
Date: Mon, 16 Nov 1998 04:50:47 EST Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: Lx555[at]aol.com Subject: Ir-D Corder MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Message-ID: <1312884591.F1CB1900.5704[at]bradford.ac.uk> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Corder
  
Irish Taunt English

My friend Dr John Martin - who studies the history of the English countryside
- - has informed me of a taunt used by Irish harvesters in the Fenlands of
England. (from J. W. Day A History of the Fens: written in the late 30s) The
Irish when harangued by English labourers would just shout "Corder" it seems.
This would be late 19th century/early 20th and was taken by the English as an
insult. Any ideas who it is and why?
Alexander Peach
DeMontfort University UK.
 TOP
31  
16 November 1998 11:22  
  
Date: Mon, 16 Nov 1998 11:22:42 PST Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: Patrick Maume <P.Maume[at]Queens-Belfast.AC.UK> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D Corder
  
Subject: Ir-D Corder
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

From: Patrick Maume
Corder was the name of the villain of the popular melodrama MARIA MARTEN OR
THE MURDER IN THE RED BARN, based on a real English murder case from the
early nineteenth century - he seduced Maria Marten on promise of marriage then
murdered her to get rid of her. I think what we have here is an example of the
widespread Irish nationalist tendency to pick up sensationalist accounts of English
sexual and other crimes in order to claim superior virtue for themselves. (In the
Home Rule debates the high rate of religious observance and low levels of
illegitimacy in Ireland - especially the Catholic areas - were often cited to refute
charges of Irish lawlessness, while separatists like Arthur Griffith denounced the
immorality and jingoism of the British working classes as proof of the folly of those
like Davitt who thought it was possible to get the British workers to join with the
Irish against their common aristocratic enemy.) It is of course quite well-known for
poor and less powerful countries and regions to console themselves with such
claims of moral superiority - I believe there used to be a strong tendency among
Latin American intellectuals to contrast the material genius of the USA with the
spiritual genius of Latin civilisation.
Hope this is some help,
Patrick.


On Mon, 16 Nov 1998 04:50:47 EST Lx555[at]aol.com wrote:

> From:Lx555[at]aol.com> Date: Mon, 16 Nov 1998 04:50:47 EST
> Subject: Ir-D Corder
> To: irish-diaspora[at]Bradford.ac.uk
>
>
>
> Irish Taunt English
>
> My friend Dr John Martin - who studies the history of the English countryside
> - has informed me of a taunt used by Irish harvesters in the Fenlands of
> England. (from J. W. Day A History of the Fens: written in the late 30s) The
> Irish when harangued by English labourers would just shout "Corder" it seems.
> This would be late 19th century/early 20th and was taken by the English as an
> insult. Any ideas who it is and why?
> Alexander Peach
> DeMontfort University UK.
>
 TOP
32  
16 November 1998 11:44  
  
Date: Mon, 16 Nov 1998 11:44:28 -0000 Reply-To: irish-diaspora[at]bradford.ac.uk Sender: From: "Elizabeth Malcolm" <elm[at]lineone.net> [IR-DLOG9811.txt]
  
Ir-D News from Liverpool
  
Subject: Ir-D News from Liverpool
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Message-ID:

There will be a reception at the Irish Embassy in London on 18 November at
6.00 pm to mark the appointments of Professor Marianne Elliott as Director
of the Institute of Irish Studies, University of Liverpool, and Professor
Donald Akenson as the first Beamish Research Professor of Migration Studies
at the Institute. Professor Akenson will give his inaugural lecture in
Senate House, University of Liverpool, at 5.30 pm on 23 November.

On 24 and 25 November President Mary McAleese